HomeSite MapContact
Sex, Body & Health
Your Mind & Feelings
My Story
Healthy Eating
Natural Health
Keep Fit
Look It Up
Video & Games
HealthyLinks
Hotlines
Email Article  Print Article  Rate This Article 
 
Back     

Summer Vegetable Pocket

Summer Vegetable Pocket



Leafy green salads are yummy but they aren't great travelers. You can always toss your favorite veggies in a pita pocket for a quick and healthy snack on the go.

Servings: 2 half-pita sandwiches

Equipment: vegetable grater

How long does it take?

15 minutes

What's in it?

1 piece of 6 1/2-inch whole-wheat pita bread
1 cup lettuce (about three Romaine lettuce leaves)
1/2 fresh tomato
1 medium carrot
1/2 medium cucumber
2 Tablespoons low-fat Ranch dressing

How to make it:

Step 1: Prepare the veggies.
Wash the vegetables and peel the carrot and cucumber. Slice the tomato into three or four 1/4-inch slices. Slice the cucumber lengthwise into thin slices. Grate the carrot, using a grater with medium-sized holes. Tear the lettuce with your clean fingers.

Step 2: Prepare the pita.
Slice the pita bread in half and open the pockets. Be gentle so you don't tear a hole in the side.

Step 3: Stuff it!
Fill each pita half with some of each vegetable. Pour 1 Tablespoon of dressing into each pita half.

Share with a friend right away, or wrap your pita halves for the road.

Nutrition breakdown:

Calories 133, Protein 4 g, Carbohydrate 28 g, Fat 2 g (saturated fat 0), Dietary Fiber 4 g, Vitamin A over 100% of the RDA, Vitamin C 17 mg (34% of RDA), Vitamin E 2 mg (20 of RDA), Thiamin 17% of RDA, Magnesium 33 mg (12% of RDA)

What's in it for you?

This sandwich is alive with five. That's approximately how many servings of fruits and vegetables to aim for each day to keep you healthy. Each one of these veggie pockets counts as 1-1/2 servings.

Chef's tip:

There are all kinds of graters, for all kinds of food. Food processors often have an attachment to grate cheese or vegetables. If you use a flat hand-held grater, be sure to watch your fingers as you scrape the food along the surface—you can get some nasty knuckle nicks.

 
 
 
Last Modified Date: 10/13/2000